Thursday, July 4, 2013

Frigidaire Affinity E64 error

If your Frigidaire Affinity dryer is beeping at you and giving you the "E64 CALL SERVICE" business, chances are you have a bad heating element. The good news is, with a screwdriver, a pair of pliers (a multimeter if you have one) and a new heater element you can fix this yourself and save a couple hundred bucks.

Below I outline a step by step process to do this on the Frigidaire Affinity, but this guide may help with other dryers, as they basically all function the same way.

A WORD OF CAUTION: You will be handling a lot of thin sheet metal components. Be careful as it is easy to cut yourself on them.

First you'll want to unplug the dryer and shut off the water source.

Then disconnect the vent hose and the water feed (if applicable). Be sure and shut off the water valve first, or you'll have a mess!

You can use a screwdriver, but a small socket makes life easier.

Larger pliers are better, but you can get by with a standard set.
Next you need to remove the lid, the back and the lid brace. To remove the lid: remove the screws and pull straight back. It may resist a bit at first. If it does, wiggle it a bit and it should break loose.

Just a couple screws hold the lid on.

Now remove all the screws holding the back piece on. Don't forget the ones in the middle, including the access panel.

There are a lot of these guys.
The brace screws are are next. After you get the brace unscrewed, just pull it up and out of the way.

A couple on the top and a couple in the back.
Next (if you have a pedestal), remove the top screws of the pedestal brackets. Note: these screws are slightly different, so keep them separate.

Leave the bottom screws in, for now.
Now you'll want to remove the screw holding the vent tube in. It should be screwed in at a slight angle. After you unscrew it, push the tube in as far as you can to facilitate removal of the back.

Unscrew and push.
Now unscrew the power connection (you did unplug the dryer first, right?) and remove the back. It may take some effort to clear the tube, brackets and water connection. I usually pull the top out at a good angle and work it back and forth to free it.

I like to mark the wires before I remove them.
A bit of angle helps.

If you can't clear the water connection,
try loosening the mount screw under the padding.
Now that you have the back off, you can pull the vent tube out and move it out of the way. The heating unit is on the right and you'll need to remove 3 screws and some wiring connections to free it.


Screw 1.

Screw 2.

Screw 3.

Unscrew these sensors with the red wires.
Unplug these ones. I like to mark them for good measure.
You can unplug this one. No need to undo the bolt.


 Now that the unit is free, turn it so you can pull it out, It may take some doing, but it should come out without too much trouble.

Once free, if you have a multimeter, you can test the coils. Set the meter to the lowest ohms setting and test each coil. You can also do a visual inspection, although it might not be obvious.

Note setting and what zero resistance looks like.
Testing.

Good should read around 20-50.
Busted coil on the right.
Once you have verified the problem, via multimeter or visually, you can replace the part and reassemble. WARNING: When reassembling, do not over torque the screws. Sheet metal bends very easily. Snug is good!

Reassembly is basically just the reverse of removal, however you may have trouble with the pedestal brackets when putting the back cover on. If you do, loosen the bottom screws on the bracket to give a little more wiggle room.
A stubby screw driver, or small ratchet helps on the lower bracket screws.

The new part will likely not have the mounting bracket attached, so be sure and not damage it when removing the heating unit.

Shiny new unit.
Now I know what you're thinking: "Hey, I only had one bad coil out of 3, maybe I can just replace that one!"
I had the same thought, but I figured I'd replace the whole unit anyways, since that's how they sell them.
But I did think: "Well, I might as well pull these good coils and stash them for later in case this happens again. Because I'm smart like that!"

But when I pulled the canister open, I quickly saw that the other 2 coils were also broken, but just in such a way that they still made contact to complete the circuit. It also became apparent that switching out a single coil would be no picnic, and probably not worth the trouble of keeping them around, even if they were intact.

So there you have it. Hopefully this has been some use to you and saved you a couple bucks.

81 comments:

  1. Thank you for this write up it helped a ton!

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  2. Omg!! I am not mechanically inclined and this was soooo overwhelming and complicated for me. Thanks anyway.

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    Replies
    1. Sorry it wasn't helpful! Sometime DIY projects can be a bit involved, for sure.

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  3. Thank you for such an awesome and detailed tutorial Wade. One of the best I have ever seen. Very generous.

    I was wondering if you ever considered accessing the element by taking the FRONT PANEL off - as I have seen in other postings for a similar model.

    It appears to be quicker and easier to access.

    Do you have any reasons for going through the back panel?

    Please advise.

    -Mreo
    mreo-at-mac dot-com

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    1. I went through the back because the only info I could find on doing this, at the time (which was very little and the reason I wrote this tutorial) advised removing the back panel.

      I've never pulled the front panel off and wasn't even aware of that option to tell you the truth! But if I need to do this again, I will surely investigate that route. I'll have to look at my machine closer, to see how that front panel comes off.

      Thanks for the info!

      Delete
  4. Update April 2014.

    Wade does an AWESOME job of detailing the procedure above.

    It is important to note that 95% of the time, it is indeed the heater element that is causing the "E64 Call Service"code. Heater element costs about $89.00 PLUS Shipping from www.searspartsdirect.com

    I will add however, that I strongly advise that BEFORE going through all of what Wade has detailed above, that you FIRST access the Heater Element from the FRONT SIDE.

    The heater element is easily accessed by removing the dryer's top lid and front panel in about 15 minutes. All it takes is unscrewing a few screws and temporarily disconnecting a wire harness that detects when the door is opened (during normal operation).

    By doing this FIRST, you can access the heater element and perform an OHMS TEST by using a multimeter and determine that it is indeed the element that is causing the error. If you find that the heater element is working just fine, you have just saved yourself about 45 minutes worth of work by NOT having to disassemble the back side.

    Sometimes (according to online info) the e64 code is caused by the Thermoster and/or Thermostat - both of which cost FAR LESS than the heater element, and both are easily accessed from the front for testing and/or removing/replacing.

    HOWEVER, it is DIFFICULT to REMOVE the heater element through the front side - in the event that the element is indeed the cause for the E64 error.

    If that is the case with your dryer unit, then you will need to REMOVE THE HEATER ELEMENT THROUGH THE BACK, by following Wades very detailed DIY instructions.

    I hope that this information helps all who take-on this DIY project, as Wade and I did.

    I got a real sense of pride and satisfaction after I successfully replaced the heater element on my dryer unit, and saved myself a couple of hundred dollars in mark-up costs and service fees that I would have incurred if I had not done it myself.

    -Mario

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    1. Thanks for the excellent info, Mario!

      The only thing I would like to add is that although 2 of the coils on my unit showed good resistance on the multimeter, they did in fact also have breaks in them. The broken parts were still touching completing the circuit. Such breaks may only disconnect when the coils heat up.

      So, if your OHMs test looks good and you still have problems after replacing the parts Mario mentioned, you may still have a coil break that only presents itself under load.

      Thanks again Mario, great info!

      Delete
    2. Mario,

      Once you get the front off where is the thermistor and thermostat, also what should they read on the meter?

      Delete
  5. Thank you, this is an outstanding guide. I had no problems at all replacing my heating element with the instructions you provided.

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    1. Thanks for sopping by, and glad I could help!

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  6. I would just like to thank you for this post it is amazing I just got the heating element in today and fixed my dryer thank you thank you

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for the comment, Brittany!
      Glad you found this post helpful.

      Delete
  7. Thank you for taking the time to put this together! Our dryer is up and running again thanks to you. Cheers from Denver! All the best to you.

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    1. Thanks Meghan, glad I could help! I'm actually just down the way from you, in Aurora. We probably bought our heating element at the same appliance outlet store. :)

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  8. Hello - Thanks - What happens if I hook up the red wires wrong? I have the new element in and its working but would it work if the red wires on the sensor were out of order?

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    1. Often, if the wires are the same on sensors like that, the order won't matter as it is a switch and the sensor just completes a circuit (open/closed type circuit).
      Also, when things are hooked up wrong, you'll usually find out in a hurry.

      That said, I do try to mark all connections to hook them up the exact same as they were, just in case.

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  9. Hi Wade, Great Job! What is the part # of the whole heating canister?
    Thanks!
    Tom

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    1. Hi Tom,
      Sorry but I don't recall the part number. I called a local appliance supply place and gave them my make/model and they pulled the part for me.
      That said, a quick look around and P/N 134792700 sure looks to be the one, but I can't say for certain.

      Delete
  10. I get the e64 code but it still dries think it is still that part?

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    1. It may very well be. When mine started to show the code it would also dry for a while. Then it started to shut off mid-cycle, but would go right back on if I started again. Eventually it stopped working all together, until I replaced the heating element.

      Delete
  11. Awesome step by step! Thanks so much, I made it through and it worked great

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  12. I have a Frigidaire Affinity dryer with the same code, e64. My model # is FASE7073NW0, and I have found that the heating element is fine. Do you know what the other part numbers are for the "Thermoster and/or Thermostat" for this model?

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    Replies
    1. Sorry James, I have not replaced those parts so I don't have those numbers for you.

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  13. Thank you so much for this tutorial!! It worked like a charm! So excited to have saved some money!!

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  14. Everything went smoothly, but when I plugged the dryer in, one of the sensors exploded.

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    Replies
    1. It was most likely grounding out on something. I had the same thing happen but it was with the heating element in my furnace. I was leaning against the furnace to see if it was working and think my weight moved it slightly and grounded out on something.

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  15. Would you advise against, or should i say is it possible to rebuild the coil with the right gauge Kanthal wire?

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    Replies
    1. That would be above my pay grade. ;)
      The new unit is only about $125 as I recall, so it's a matter of your expertise plus your time as to if it is worth the effort or not, I suppose.

      Delete
  16. I can't get enough force on the screws that hold the bracket that holds the heating element. These are the two that hold the legs in place. Any ideas? Thanks.

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    1. Using a small ratchet with a 1/4" socket and one of those little screwdriver bits (that come with quick change drivers and drills) works well for most side torque issues,
      Or sometimes a stubby screwdriver will allow you to get on top of it more and apply the needed force.

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    2. Thank you. Great post very helpful!

      Delete
  17. Thanks so much for this awesome post! I was able to test all the coils and confirm they're all working so it's not my heating element that's busted.

    Does anyone know how to test for short circuit across motor relay (RL2)? My dryer motor is running continuously, cannot cancel it out. It only stops running with the door open. The error message is E51. I've searched online the last 2 days for anything about that error and it looks like I need to test RL2 (I think) but can't figure out where or how to do that.

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  18. If my dryer is heating fine before shutdown could it be the board or the thermostat?

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    1. Hi Bryan,
      My dryer was also heating fine, then shutting down. I suspect that the heating element had broken coils that would make contact for a while, then disconnect under load and cause the shut down. It wasn't until one of the coils completely sprung that the dryer refused to heat at all.

      Delete
  19. I fixed it thanks to your post it was easy. Turns out i had a bad coil could have never figured it out without you i used a meter no visual. I thank you sir took me no time thanks to you keep up the good work.

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  20. Our code came up e64 but when my hisband used the meter ,everything was fine. He read online that its the box on top right corner but dont know.what iys called. Dryer still works but shuts off before end of drying cycle and says error code e64. Can anyone help.

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  21. I followed your instructions and they made the trouble shooting and replacement of the heater element easy for a first timer. Thanks for all the help.

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  22. My dryer sometimes throws the code immediately when I turn it on, but will run anyway. Sometimes it starts fine and throws the code mid-load. It does run longer before shutdown if I keep a window open in the laundry room, letting cold air into the room. It seems I have the same problem you had where the coil tests fine but fails under load, but I am hesitant to pay $100 for a new heating element if a much cheaper part may be the culprit.... What do you suggest?

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    Replies
    1. That's a tough call. You could try removing the unit and see if a visual inspection shows anything, but it can be tough to see breaks in the coils. But if you go to the trouble of taking it all apart, you're probably going to wish you had the replacement handy to just swap in.

      Delete
  23. Thanks for posting this! This really helped! A couple of weeks before Christmas and the code came up. I panicked and stressed. Then, I googled the code, and this popped up. This post gave me the confidence that we could fix this cheaply and easily, and not have it affect our Christmas, lol the part cost 91 dollars on Amazon( including a 2 yr warranty for $7.) we fixed it today! Thank you very much!!

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  24. Thanks a ton! I have a bad coil as well. Now to find somewhere local that sells the dang thing!!

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  25. I'm in the process of trouble shooting this I replaced the element right away not even testing it because old one was warped out of shape but I'm still getting this code. It will dry for about 30-45 mins then shut down and will only run for about 10 mins if u start it again Will be getting the meter out tomorrow and testing things Would you suspect the thermostat or thermistor for this? I think I will go through the front this time looks easy and drum pops right out if u need to remove the element FYI just have to remove the belt

    Thanks

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  26. I am a Appliance Repair person. I checked element from front. Ohmed good. but code came back. Then you scratch head could it be control board or sensor. Found this article and it was very well made and helpful. The meter shows good but when heated up the coil separates. Removal of this element from back was easier (has lots of screws) than going from front (which I do on other brands).

    It was nice to find this. The meter test can't be trusted, and you need to shake it or move the coils around (visual inspect). Also as they heat up they can ground them self to the duct. so check and make sure none are close to the side
    metal duct.

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  27. 2 years down the road and this article is still helping people. Thanks the great info, pics helped speed up the process for me, and my dryer is working again. Thank you again for taking the time to make this post.

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  28. Thanks for all of this information and for the additional comments.
    Quick (naive) question: does all of this apply to the gas version of the dryer?

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    1. No, the gas version will burn gas in a similar canister, instead of the electric heating coils in this tutorial. I guess the equivalent to the busted coils in the electric unit, would maybe be a bad heating element/glow plug? Can't say for certain, I haven't worked on a the gas version.

      Delete
  29. Awesome tutorial, just got the code. Hopefully I can get this fixed.

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  30. This helped my bf a lot. My dryer was broken and this company was trying to charge me too much to fix it. Thanks to this tutorial my boyfriend saved us $100+

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  31. This was a perfect Step by Step guide. Just wish I had smaller hands! :0)

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  32. Any difference between the $49 element and the $120 element online? There is a huge variation in prices! How about quality?

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  33. I will perform this surgery tonight. In the mean time, do you have any information on where I may purchase a Control Panel, not a Control Board?

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  34. I started with code E61 ran 15 minutes then got E64. Now it works about 5 minutes and stops.

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  35. I recently moved my machines and now I'm
    Getting the code E64, could have the new pig tail on wrong maybe? 😱

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    1. this just happend to me movr then and now e64

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  36. Did you say it was easy to test the element from the front?? Isn't that element way in the back on the bottom? Unless you access it from straight above maybe I could see. Tackling the job tonight, just not sure on trying to access element from the front. Will see once I start. lol

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  37. So I went with the original attack thru the back of the machine because there were screws in the front that could barely get to to go from front. All went well thanks to the great breakdown on procedure done here!!! I can only get one coil out of the three to register on the electrical tester. So I'm going to assume the element will be the culprit here. I had only one issue with the whole procedure so far......when removing all those little back bolts, I looked at the handful and noticed one longer bolt that I have no clue where it came from?? lol

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  38. Had error code 64. Changed the heating element. Still throwing code 64. The dryer still heats and runs but sometimes the clothes are still damp. Seems like it only throws the code at the end of the cycle. Any ideas on what else it may be?

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  39. Did you hook everything back up the same? If so, could also check for continuity on the new one just incase it's faulty. If all is good, then I'd look into the thermosets and what not on there. A lot of guys get faulty thermoset or whatever it's called, coming up as e64 as well. That could also be an issue, not letting the element fire up and heat. Good luck, and keep us posted!!

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  40. Thermoster would be the correct term.

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  41. I was able to remove the whole assembly of heating element with the stand, I took off the exhaust tube and set aside on the left then took the assembly on the left side-ways. The heating elements with the whole (round canister) assemble can be ordered for 185 Canadian Dollars. Note: the stand and the thermistor (thermostat, sometimes called the temperature cut-off device) is NOT included (optional) in the order. this site is very informative, thanks for all these comments, it really gives lots of ideas. So, you can remove the assembly thru the back side. He he he.

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  42. Great tutorial. I replace my heating element in my frigidaire dryer about 8 months ago because I got the E64 error. It worked fine until now and I am getting the error again. Any idea why it would burn out again so quickly?

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  43. I definitely had 2 bad coils after checking with my multimeter, and Amazon had this exact part for $84.88, and free 2-day prime shipping -- SCORE! Thank you!

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  44. Can you explain how to re wire the electrical? I'm not sure where the ground and white go?

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  45. Since my dryer is doing the same thing..drying hot then when cooling down throw's e64 code...now won't heat at all...I am just planning on replacing the heating element, the safety thermostat and the thermal limiter....I heard that any one of these can be the culprit and I don't want to go and replace one and then have to wait for another part just to tear it all apart again...this thread has helped for info on this issue...thank you! I have torn this dryer apart a few years ago but haven't had to replace anything as of yet...we will see hahaha

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  46. FANTASTIC article! I searched many sites for relevant information on my E-64 error and found this to be the most useful. I ordered the heating element from Amazon ($78.89-Prime) on Friday and received it today, Sunday, via USPS. I referred back to your illustrations a number of times as I did Step 1 - take apart. STep 2 - put together, was so easy with your advice about the wires and the brace. The lowest screw on the back skin for the flat heat tube (you will see) argued with me as it was a bit far away for the short screw to bite into. I found another slightly longer screw and away we went!

    Awesome write up Wade. Thank you. I owe you!

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    1. Glad to see this post is still helping people nearly 4 years later. Thanks for the kind words!

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    2. Wade,
      Thank you for the tutorial. Excellent work sir!

      Delete
  47. help guys replace the heating element and still getting the e64 code. any ideas?

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  48. Unknown,

    I had the same situation after replacing the coil and went ahead with the Amazon purchase of the sensors. Problem solved...

    Gene

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    Replies
    1. i did end up getting the sensors and nothing still getting the e64 code..

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    2. Thank you Wade! It took me three hours and $75 to fix my dryer. If I knew what city you lived in I would buy you a beer! This is one of the best posts I have ever seen. Thank you! Rudy

      Delete
    3. Glad it helped Rudy. I'll take a rain check on that beer. ;)

      Delete
  49. i still havent been able to get it to run e64 pops up. one thing i notice is when i switch the prong wires left to right, right to left it doesn't turn on at all.. i check the continuity of the 3 wire prong and its good on all 3 wires.. maybe the outlet is wrong????

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  50. Wade, thank you for your quick answers... all of these are very helpful. I have a twist though... My dryer will heat... show an E-64 error... but once it cools down it will work again... until it heats up and E-64 pops up again... does this sound like a sensor or thermostat issue?

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    Replies
    1. That's what the dryer I worked on would do. My suspicion is the heating coils that were broken would separate when they got hot, throw the code and stop heating. So it may be a different issue, but others have reported bad heating elements that will dry for a time then quit and throw the code as well.
      Good luck!

      Delete
  51. Thank you for the tutorial. Excellent work sir.
    Heating services Rye

    ReplyDelete